Why the BnB remains my favorite soap

There are three things you can count on with The Bold and The Beautiful:

1.  Anyone close to death (their own or that of someone they care about)  will also be incredibly horny and will feel the ‘need’ to have sex before death occurs.  It’s post the death-that-never-happen sex that usually produces a child.  Fans are still waiting to find out where Taylor’s post-death-that-never-happened child is.  She seems to be the only person who has escaped the happening.  Or has she?

2.  If there’s a dying and/or vulnerable woman, Nick Marone is going to boink her for all he’s worth – which is not much.  It’s what he does. 

  • Felicia Forrester?  Cancer patient.
  • Brooke Logan?  Suicidal
  • Taylor Hayes?  Recovering from alcohol addiction
  • Bridget Forrester?  Broken heart
  • Katie Logan?  Dying heart transplant patient.

3.  This show manages to mangle and mash the concepts of God, character’s sexual behavior, and ‘heavenly blessings’ more than any other soap in the history of daytime.  I don’t know what guilt complexes the writers have about the show they bring to air, but I could probably own Trump towers if I had a dollar for each time a character referenced God or some blessed miracle event.  God, in the soap world,  blesses them with someone else’s husband/wife, supports their betrayals of spouses and children, kills off inconvenient babies in utero, and supports the creation of ‘love children’ with a spouse’s family member.  Daytime’s most salacious daytime show is also its most “religious”, and frankly, that creeps me out.

And still, for as much as I hate it, I love the soap too.

Overall, daytime writers and producers continue using the old soap titles, but produce shows that  have nothing to do with the shows we remember from the soap’s glory days. 

Daytime execs swap out beloved legacy characters in a heartbeat for younger, cheaper-to-pay, fashion models who are using the genre as a ‘stepping stone’.  Legacy characters, as the ultimate insult to fans, are sometimes used to introduce the newbies, before disappearing. Not The Bold and The Beautiful – for as much as BnB fans may hate the actions of some of their favorite legacy characters, at least they see them!

This show began with its core four (Susan Flannery’s Stephanie Douglas Forrester, Katherine Kelly Lang’s Brooke Logan (Forrester, Ronn Moss’s Ridge Forrester, John McCook’s Eric Forrester).  The core four continue to remain the show’s main attraction.

A for the rest of daytime, I barely recognize most of it.   Whatever happened to the old adage that you have to spend money to make it?  Fans are tired of stunt casting and stunt reappearances of beloved favorite legacy characters for short periods of time, often during sweeps (a la Genie Francis’ Laura Spencer, who’ll make another brief appearance soon). 

Spend the money on the sets – if one more person in Springfield/Peapack moves into Olivia’s hotel, I’m out of the GL fanbase.  I can’t take the dark walls and the ‘sameness’ of the rooms.  Learn a lesson from the YnR, which still has so many rich sets.  Why can’t soaps filmed in the same location share sets (remodeling them as needed whenever they’re used)?  Trade off?  Do SOMETHING people!

Spend the money on the actors and legacy characters we care about (Where the hell is Scott Bryce’s Craig Montgomery, ATWT?).

Spend the money and hire writers who aren’t bored, and stuck repeating their last best storylines, making daytime far too repetitve. 

Stop with the misogyny, the subtle racism, the homophobia. 

Stop killing off the characters we grew up loving, and giving us characters our children don’t want to watch.

Stop turning our favorite characters (even the remaining legacy characters) into morons when you want to introduce new characters — even the BnB is guilty of this problem, turning Brooke Logan into a fool for worthless men like Nick Marone, and Deacon Sharpe before him.

We don’t want stunts, explosions, possessions, and other storylines too hokey for even the Sci Fi channel to take seriously.  We want emotional investment and big payoffs, events that leave us talking long after the episode has aired.

Stop telling us how great your storylines are, either off screen through the soap mags, or onscreen by using the characters.  Write storylines we like and we’ll tell YOU that, by tuning in.  Every time you promise something great, and let us down, we stop believing you the next time you make an empty promise.

The Bold and The Beautiful doesn’t get it right, every time, but seeing familiar faces and having characters who are more often, than not, consistent,  is almost enough for me.